Life in a (THE) Swing State

If you’re following the political trail of the Presidential race, then chances are you are pretty tired of hearing about Ohio (and Pennsylvania and Florida) . . . but mainly Ohio.  Unless you’ve lived here during one of these very closely contested races, it is difficult for you to imagine the deluge of political propaganda that is thrown at us Ohioans.  Television, radio, Internet, door-to-door, posters, billboards, yard signs . . . it truly is incredible how important my vote has become.  One of the candidates is within a few miles of my house just about every week.  It’s a great opportunity for political education for my children – but what to teach them?

Really it’s just my son who’s old enough to pay attention to this election season and we’ve started fielding his questions – “Are we Republicans or Democrats?  Why are they saying those mean things about the President?  Are those things about Mitt Romney true?  Why do we have elections?’  and on and on we go.  While the challenges of explaining the electoral college to my seven-year-old go without saying, the real challenge I’m having is how do I help frame his reference through the perspective of a sovereign God who is control of everything – assuring him that no matter what happens, God is in control, while at the same time, encouraging biblically informed opinions and feelings about political matters.

I haven’t figured out the answer to this one, but I have been getting a lot of “how not to . . .” illustrations from other Christians in the media, on Facebook, among other places.  This is such a complicated issue, and I don’t have the energy to get into the complexity of it, but there is one specific shortcoming that has been really highlighted in this year’s Presidential election.

When Barack Obama ran for the highest U.S. office in 2008, one of the conversations I found myself having regularly with Conservatives had to do with their fear of his “liberal” Christian connection to people like Jeremiah Wright and his membership within the United Church of Christ.  Were they even Christians?  I talked to more than a few Christians who had serious doubts about that – and that really concerned them.  They were fearful of the idea of social justice (a specific target of a particular Glenn Beck episode I remember watching), of the politicizing of the UCC, among other things.  What has been particularly interesting in this year’s election is how that narrative has changed.  Granted, I have seen a speckling of concerns over Romney’s affiliation within the Mormon Church  here and there by Christians, but it has in no way been to the extent that Obama’s Christian heritage was attacked four years ago.

Obviously, the narrative has been altered in order to best benefit the candidate chosen by the GOP.  This year, perhaps more than any other, highlights how sticky the situation becomes when a religious groups become bedfellows with a particular political party.  Romney’s people know they have to give great care to the public image of his faith convictions.  They strongly state publicly his personal moral convictions about personal matters of morality that will resonate with the broader conservative Christian base, but keep the particulars of his ties to the Mormon church on the back page.

I’m not too interested in having a discussion about the awfulness (or greatness or indifferent-ness) of having a Mormon President.  What concerns me is how easily politically engaged Christians allow themselves to be duped by the media and spinsters – often while they are decrying the impact of the “liberal media” at the exact same time.  Shaking your fist at the established media outlets can give this sense that “I have done due diligence of not getting fooled by those mainstream liars,” and have a comrade with everyone else who says the same thing.  It has become the new rallying cry and the new uniter.  At the end of the day, though, the fact of the matter is we still allow our political ideology to dictate our feelings about things rather than an overflowing faith conviction.  Christians watch political news outlets and listen to their radio programs and then sprinkle some Scripture on top and feel we have a completely biblically justified political position.  Perhaps it is unfair to disconnect the two . . . however . . . in order to be as supportive of a President whose faith is based on, what most conservative Christians, at least, would say, a myth while challenging the faith of an Orthodox (though liberal) Christian illustrates this point poignantly.  We’re allowing ourselves to be united over political arguments that become more and more distant to biblical foundations.  It is easy to deceive ourselves and think that God is of a certain political persuasion (though we’d never admit that) and end up demonizing others – after all, that’s what all these political ads in Ohio do.

As I seek to provide political guidance for my children, I am working to show them the folly of image and hype.  That very image and hype of President Obama that Republicans believed won him the election in 2008 was sorely lacking during the last debate, and, ironically, many Republicans found themselves basking in the same conversation – “He looked great!’

The Christian narrative is one of peace, non-violence, loving the other, considering others before ourselves, taking care of those in need, providing for those who need provision . . . these concerns are all overtly political – unfortunately, seldom does the Christian allow their political narrative to BEGIN here!

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